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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but we are very lucky. and i think the energy market. also one being in my book is i haven't seen any of this year and 10 u.s., but now doing a pilot on the infrastructure and we try to use their brain for their solutions for energy. >> i am an israeli. i was born there. others raise their. as an israeli now, either argumentative, but this is not the forum for arguments. i am also a guest here. i enlaces gaston we're not supposed to attack, although you tempt me greatly. >> we can do that in israel. >> after my house we can do that. not everybody in israel is in agreement with you. there's many experienced people, smart people, don't hold on to your point of view. i have a very simple question. israel is a mighty country. it is the strongest country in the middle east. israel has a clichÉ of atomic weapons. for many years, they obtained like we used to do historically to obtain arms and my young days under the british magnum. all right, do you think there is any bets, bit of connection between israel being a nuclear power and iran and other nations in the middle east striving to reac
-- damage of america's policy. that's a focus on green jobs and alternative energy is imposing costs on america's economy. costs that the proponents of green jobs are not acknowledging. >> for the most part you write a lot about gender policies and politics, and is this a branch out for you to write about green jobs? >> i've also written, my books have been in the air agenda but i've written a lot in energy economics and in taxation. i'm a monthly columnist to tax knows. i've edited a book called overcoming barriers to entrepreneurship. that was published i roam and and littlefield two or three years ago so i wouldn't say it's a radical change. it's something i've been thinking about and writing about for a long time. >> thank you for joining us on booktv. >> thanks so much for having me on. >> up next on booktv, former north chicago superintendent of schools, patricia pickles, presents her thoughts on how to improve the american educational system. >> first, i thank the business leaders for allowing me to join my vision in education. i also want to recognize some of the groups for o
to address. when you consider energy more important than water. >> host: thanks from buffalo new york. what should the government be in our life? we posted on new york in my personal life while the federal government not much. state come of it more, local, a lot more. the federal government should be maintaining harmony among the states keeping them in line regards to protecting americans' rights keeping the nation in harmony that is on facebook. next up is cheri watching in des moines. an independent. good morning. >> caller: yes, i do agree with mitt romney. i think the government is getting way too big. that's my comment. thank you. >> host: next up is less in detroit. he wore on. good morning. >> caller: good morning. we in michigan have to decide in november whether to allow the state to come in to the city and as a public use to take over and print the financial manager were emergency manager for the cities that have financed the distress and take over the local government where they can come in and remove the city officials like the mayor and the city council. i don't think that's th
over with energy. you want to change things you look around and see things that need changing. people kill each other and they shouldn't. people are cold and ill late rate. they needle shelters and booking. the words needs changes. [applause] [applause] we have a clip of the favorite. the daily show report on a leftist protesters in 0 limb with a, washington who chained himself to a building in protest but it was the wrong building. >> meet jody of olympia washington. a man driven to protest. the bush administration give the ultimate tim to saddam hussein to leave iraq, i got ready and got a chain and locks and i went to commit an act of civil disobedience by locking myself to a door. >> he known chain himself year here to the u.s. department of energy substation. ib steady he ended up here. changed to the side door of a non-profit rural aid organization. [laughter] he got the wrong building but at least he had the right message. >> your sign reduce deficit. and you shout nod blood for oil. and you were chained to a health organization. what's your message. >> well, -- so. wrong build
to go down. stock markets would go down, planes would fall out of the sky from the energy sector would fail. there would be a global catastrophe. the point of this is to show how dependent we are as a society on this kind of open source collaborative labor. the fact that here's the thing that would've sounded like a utopian utopian fantasy 25 or 30 years ago. now, we are hooked on it as a progressive society. whether it is the private sector or the public sector. all of us now depend upon the product of that pure network collaboration. you know, when i look at how much we build and upload of collaboration, that is the thing that makes me say, what more can we do? what can we saw with this peer networking approach? >> host: the next call comes from alta dena, california. paco hello? we are going to have to put you on hold. you need to turn down the volume on your tv. we have bob in florida. >> caller: this is a great show and i appreciate that show in the guest as well. i am working on something and i am listening to you guys at the same time. i believe there are at least a handful of u
as important for the nation's economy. it reduces fuel burn, saves energy, and improves the environment. implementing this improves the efficiency and safety of aviation while adding jobs and strengthening our economy. the case for next generation has been and continues to be compelling. i would, again, like to thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member costello, and the committee for hosting the panel today. i look forward to any questions you might have. thank you, again, sir. >> thank you. mr. renadli. >> thank you, mr. chairman, members of the subcommittee, thank you for holding this hearing today. it's a catch all phrase over the last ten years that means everything to everybody in the aviation community. we are proud to be involvedded in the essential stake holder in nextgen development and participates in the advisory committee which mr. barger spoke of. the committee has done an outstanding job of simpling the elevator speech of what nextgen is. using satellite technology, reducing carbon emissions, using best technology to reduce voice community cations or voice saturation on fr
.s./china cooperation in clean energy, an overview of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last innovate, finally -- november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan: is there a regional end game. the back story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned that we had organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks. we hadn't cleared the names with him, he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks just as he will today, and then he was warmly greeted by our own distinguished scholar, robin wright, and the rest is obvious. some days later i heard from him as follows in his gravelly voice: sometimes i know i can be a pain in the -- dot, dot, dot. so this time it was much easier to convince henry to show up, and we did let him know who the panelists were in advance. he approved of you all. [laughter] so join me in welcoming a legendary statesman, my defense policy seat mat
red sox fan. he tried to get you going. people scurry around you have the energy going on. and as people start to sort of give an camp what's going on. we you have the high energy going on. it could be very, very intox candidating. we don't have constitutional history together to guide us. we don't have parameters that you might have in the northerly workplace. we are just -- we're a workplace without boundaries. we have a man you'll we could give people that was this thick. it was about about five pages. an employee manual. i don't know what we put in it. might have here's how you can get your health insurance benefit. here are the restrooms. you have the energetic group of people and their competitive. and maybe you could even say we're a little bit ambitious. right. you come in to the environment, many people came in without a job. they were volunteers and want to get a job. some people -- they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility. right than they probably traditional in t
to vote, do so, but that energy needs to be put into social movements in which we demand on our own terms what we want and need in our own lives rather than putting face to an elected official and crossing fingers in hopes they do what we want, and for an example, the students in quebec on strike for months because there was a proposed tuition hike which they said was unacceptable. they said we will not pay. we're going to be in the streets until you get rid of the hikes. they tried to make protests illegal. what's come of this? the tuition hike did not go through, and the law for bidding protests was appealed. >> again, please ask a specific question. >> i know. it's terrible. my question, i suppose, would be what do you see as the value for social movements of political change. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for that example. i think, hopefully, folks realize the reason i was asked to testify before members of congress was because of my work on such a social movement. there was students on our campus who organized collectively to address this concern with our insurance and who saw
older remember. he was in his 60's when he was running so he did not have the energy of richard nixon running in 1960 or obama running in 2008. >> and mrs. eisenhower, lott has been written about your parents relationship with the eisenhower's. how would you describe it? >> well i think that one of the things i enjoy doing when i was working on the project of eisenhower's retirement years was to look at that relationship and to think about it more and i'm amazed that eisenhower and nixon got along as well as they did because when you think about it, you have two presidents rumbling around together. a president is going to be someone who is very driven. he has an agenda. he has a vision. he knows where he is going so you have dwight eisenhower and then you have richard nixon who in 39 becomes a vice president who already is showing signs that he is on his way so the fact that they got along so well, i mean as well as they get i would say, think is a testament to several things but i think first of all eisenhower made the vice presidency significant. he sent my parents to 53 nations aro
, factory floor, and it has to transform education. second two is debt and receive dit and energy and climate. >> host: next call from indiana, is it dewit? >> caller: my question is from mr. friedman. i remember what you're talking about, the economy being the most senseless partnership of the government and the private sector. i wonder where that partnership stands right now? i mean, have we been witnessing the decline of the state in that partnership in recent years? i'm asking this as a recent immigrant to the united states, you know, someone who is really concerned. thank you very much. >> guest: what a wonderful question. i appreciate that. that is really a core argument of our book that what made america great was we had this amazing public-private partnership, and the public basically provided the foundation for our market economy and our great entrepreneurs to really launch into the world. what was that public side? educated people, up and beyond whatever the technology was, have the world's best infrastructure, roads, airport, tell come, bandwidth, the open immigration h
immediately on some big series, where they--you could use all that energy and idealism? i've always thought that was a mistake, the way we treat young people in our business. and it's true in a lot of fields. c-span: you know, you--and whenever you appear on the network here, you use the language that you want to use whenever you want to use it. and there is a column in here, as you know, in which you have a little gimmick. >> guest: mm-hmm. c-span: i--i'm not sure i can repeat it--maybe you can--where you list one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight words. >> guest: right. mm-hmm. c-span: and then you say, 'hold on.' and then you go on to write sentences for each one. >> guest: uh-huh. uh-huh. cock, prick, ass, breast. and what i'm--all of which, of course, are legitimate words used in--in one context and--and then in another context have connotations that are either vulgar language or--or... c-span: let me give the audience an idea of what you're talking about. >> guest: yeah. c-span: here's a sentence you use. 'this needle and prick all those balloons, so we can--take this needle
king jr.. and now thanks to the vision, commitment and shared energy of one person, we now have a hot web site and live streaming video of our event, national press coverage and several cavorting lectures and presentations and you know who that one person is. she is the lifeblood of the anisfeld-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade mary louise khan. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an important event on cleveland social and intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people including ron of course but also cindy schultz. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up for cindy. [applause] as married with louise put it to me just yesterday and i quote the e-mail making sure i was going to be here, the e-mail -- called me when i was on the plane. i stop to get a shoe shine and she almost had a heart attack. i'm quoting from her e-mail to shove her that i do read them even if i do ignore them. [laughter] edith anisfeld-wolf she wrote was a qui
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)